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Brooks Cooper
Brooks Cooper

Blue Columbine LINK


A brand new look for Columbine, Aquilegia, Early Bird Purple and Blue brings an all new color combination of purple and blue. its petals and spurs are saturated with deep colors and enhanced with sunny yellow centers of stamens. The Early Bird Series of Columbines have been proven as exceptional garden performers and prolific bloomers with very high bud count. They also make excellent cut flowers.




blue columbine



Looking for artificial columbine flowers? This silk columbine branch in beautiful blue with hints of purple is the one for you. Offering realistic details and whimsy, these fake wildflowers sweeten any floral arrangement or bouquet.


Perhaps the most graceful and ornamental of all wildflowers. The blue columbine perennial was latin-named "Columba" or dove for its resemblance to the bird of peace. Wrote poet John Parkinson over 300 years ago, "No garden would willingly be without them."


Many have adopted the native flower into their gardens, and added their own green touch to them, resulting in numerous varieties of columbine that would otherwise not be seen in the wild. Cultivars such as Origami Columbine and Crimson Star now bloom alongside other buttercups, or Ranunculaceae, the family that all columbines belong to. Buttercups are can be identified by their multiple, simple pistils at the center of the flower, and have enormous variation, spanning 2,346 different species. Columbines are most known for the spurred petals on their flowers, resembling eagle claws, hence the genus Aquilegia. Many species are also poisonous and closely related to baneberries and monkshoods. Blue columbine is not poisonous, but should still be handled with extreme caution and ingested only minimally, if at all.


Good companions to plant with columbine are allium, daylily, foxglove, heuchera, iris, peony, phlox, and poppy.


  • A columbine plant usually lives only two to three years. However, they are abundant self-seeders so you might not even notice when the original plant dies."}},"@type": "Question","name": "Can columbine grow indoors?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "In most cases, columbine grown in containers indoors will provide you with beautiful foliage but no blooms. These plants thrive in outdoor soil.","@type": "Question","name": "Where does the columbine plant get its name?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "The genus name, Aquilegia, is from the Latin word aquila, for "eagle," and is so named because the flowers resemble the bird's claw. The common name columbine is after the Latin word for "dove," bestowed on the plant because the inverted flower was thought to resemble five birds clustered together."]}]}] .icon-garden-review-1fill:#b1dede.icon-garden-review-2fill:none;stroke:#01727a;stroke-linecap:round;stroke-linejoin:round > buttonbuttonThe Spruce The Spruce's Instagram The Spruce's TikTok The Spruce's Pinterest The Spruce's Facebook NewslettersClose search formOpen search formSearch DecorRoom Design

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Learn tips for creating your most beautiful home and garden ever.Subscribe The Spruce's Instagram The Spruce's TikTok The Spruce's Pinterest The Spruce's Facebook About UsNewsletterPress and MediaContact UsEditorial GuidelinesGardeningPlants & FlowersFlowersHow to Grow and Care for Columbine ByMarie Iannotti Marie Iannotti Facebook Marie Iannotti is a life-long gardener and a veteran Master Gardener with nearly three decades of experience. She's also an author of three gardening books, a plant photographer, public speaker, and a former Cornell Cooperative Extension Horticulture Educator. Marie's garden writing has been featured in newspapers and magazines nationwide and she has been interviewed for Martha Stewart Radio, National Public Radio, and numerous articles.Learn more about The Spruce'sEditorial ProcessUpdated on 04/22/22Reviewed by


The genus name, Aquilegia, is from the Latin word aquila, for "eagle," and is so named because the flowers resemble the bird's claw. The common name columbine is after the Latin word for "dove," bestowed on the plant because the inverted flower was thought to resemble five birds clustered together.


Native to the North American Rocky Mountains, which lends this beautiful variety its common name, Rocky Mountain Blue Columbine is one the United State's most beautiful and beloved wildflowers. An herbaceous perennial, Blue Columbine Seeds produce a lovely, delicate, blue and white bloom with lush, fern-like foliage. Blooming spring and summer, Blue Columbine can reach a height of 36 inches tall.


This mix includes seeds from our variety of blue columbines, and can include blue with blends or combinations with white and purple. Some of these plants are impressively large, and our favorite is almost bush-like with over 100 flowers per plant! The columbine flowers are held high above fern-like foliage. Plants are easy to grow, and will gently self-seed if allowed. Plants can be grown in sun or and are tolerant of poor soils and drought. An excellent addition to the garden, especially in tricky areas.


The white and lavender Columbine, Aquilegia caerulea, was adopted as the official state flower on April 4, 1899 by an act of the General Assembly. In 1925, the General Assembly made it the duty of all citizens to protect this rare species from needless destruction or waste. To further protect this fragile flower, the law prohibits digging or uprooting the flower on public lands and limits the gathering of buds, blossoms and stems to 25 in one day. It is unlawful to pick the columbine on private land without consent of the land owner.


2nd Year Maturity. Colorado Blue columbine seeds grow a spectacular all-American favorite that promises an authentic slice of the Rocky Mountains all season long. Colorado Blue is native to the temperate and shaded woodlands of Colorado and will thrive in many similar gardens. Colorado Blue seeds mature into 12-24 inch tall wildflowers bursting with "spurred" columbine blooms and promises to steal the show in any fresh cut basket, bouquet, or centerpiece. Colorado Blue columbine is versatile enough to keep indoors, on the porch, or as a classic American grow among untamed wildflower mixes.


Colorado Blue Columbine seeds have a wildflower-like hardiness and are most commonly broadcasted directly in the fall or just after the frost. Columbine seeds thrive from an over-winter frost, but will still bloom just as hardily if started indoors 4-6 weeks prior to the final frost of the spring. Seeds will germinate in 14-21 days in full lighting and plants may reseed in the garden in optimal growing conditions. Plant 3-4 Colorado Blue columbine seeds inch deep and 18 inches apart in Organically rich, evenly moist, and well-drained soil in partial sun to partial shade. Seeds may also be broadcasted for a wildflower appearance. Colorado Blue columbine seeds thrive in cool shady gardens and will decline in early summer if exposed to long hours of direct heat. Do not let soil dry out, but do not over-saturate either. Columbine has no serious pests or insects. Colorado Blue columbine seeds are perennials that mature in their 2nd year as 12-24 inch tall bushy wildflowers with a 12-24 inch spread of unique 3 inch purple columbine heads.


This is a hybrid strain of Columbine that flowers freely the first season from seed. Plants have a compact habit, the large, upfacing blooms usually bicolored in a variety of shades. This particular selection is blue and white. Flowers are attractive to hummingbirds. Removing spent flowers will increase the blooming time. Great in containers. Since Columbines are relatively short lived, allow some of the plants to go to seed and self sow. Leaf miners or sawfly may disfigure the leaves around flowering time. Simply trim off the ugly foliage and the plants will grow fresh leaves.


This is a hybrid strain of Columbine that flowers freely the first season from seed. Plants have a compact habit, the large, upfacing blooms usually bicolored in a variety of shades. This particular selection is blue and white. Flowers are attractive to hummingbirds. Removing spent flowers will increase the blooming time. Great in containers. Since Columbines are relatively short lived, allow some of the plants to go to seed and self sow. Leaf miners or sawfly may disfigure the leaves around flowering time. Simply trim off the ugly foliage and the plants will grow fresh leaves.if(typeof ez_ad_units != 'undefined')ez_ad_units.push([[300,250],'perennials_com-medrectangle-3','ezslot_2',139,'0','0']);__ez_fad_position('div-gpt-ad-perennials_com-medrectangle-3-0'); 041b061a72


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